Feb
8
2014

Latest Additions

Some recent additions to our collection — HOFers, future HOFers, and an *.
Click on the scans to view a larger version. Let me know what you think!
Whitey Ford autographed RC
Willie McCovey autographed RC
Carl Yastrzemski autographed RC
Harmon Killebrew autographed RC
Greg Maddux autographed RC
Frank Thomas autographed RC
Randy Johnson autographed RC
Jim Thome autographed RC
Omar Vizquel autographed RC
Tim Raines autographed RC
Barry Bonds autographed RC
I have more rookie cards on the way and I’ll scan and post them when they arrive.
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Jan
28
2014

Baseball HOF signed RCs

I’ve been on a semi-long break from the hobby. As I start to ease my way back in, I decided that I wanted to shift the focus on my collection. I will continue to collect players who served during WWII, 1950s and earlier debuts, multisigned items, but I will also be adding autographed HOF rookie cards.
Here are my recent additions that I picked up over the past couple of weeks. Click on the scans to view a larger version. Let me know what you think!
Ernie Banks autographed RC
Bob Gibson autographed RC
Reggie Jackson autographed RC
Bobby Doerr autographed RC
Johnny Bench autographed RC
Rod Carew autographed RC
Jim Palmer autographed RC
Bill Mazeroski autographed RC
Jim Bunning autographed RC
Cal Ripken Jr. autographed RC
Monte Irvin autographed RC
Luis Aparicio autographed RC
Carlton Fisk autographed RC
Wade Boggs autographed RC
Bruce Sutter autographed RC
Joe Morgan autographed RC
Ozzie Smith autographed RC
Eddie Murray autographed RC
Whitey Herzog autographed RC
… and these guys aren’t Hall of Famers, but I liked the cards.
Roger Clemens autographed RC
Mark McGwire autographed RC
Alex Rodriguez autographed RC
I have more rookie cards on the way and I’ll scan and post them when they arrive.
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Apr
3
2013

1956 White Sox program

Just a quick post about a recent eBay purchase. I picked up this signed Chicago White Sox program from July 07, 1956. The White Sox played the Detroit Tigers and won 14-0. Jack Harshman pitched a complete game shutout to pick up his 6th win of the 1956 season (he even homered).
Autographs include Hall of Famers Al Kaline and Larry Doby, Minnie Minoso, Harvey Kuenn, Red Wilson, Jim Small, Ray Boone, Earl Torgeson, Bill Hitchcock. The signatures are much bolder in person.
Click to enlarge the photos
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Mar
30
2013

A little break

I’ve been on a little break from collecting. After clearing my head and regaining some motivation, I am back in action. I haven’t sent any new TTMs out in nearly two months, so I haven’t received many back recently. I did get Hubert Blacknall (almost one year!) and Art Kenney on index cards.
Tomorrow I plan on sending many requests out, so hopefully I will have some updates soon. In the meantime, please take a look at my wantlist to see if you can help out!….or if you’re interested in trading, please let me know.
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Dec
18
2012

Baseball and Dad

I’m a baseball enthusiast. Even from an early age, I just felt a connection with the game. I could never really put my finger on it. Perhaps it’s because baseball, like no other sport, imitates life. A baseball season is a long haul — 162 games. Each season is filled with ups and downs. The thrill of a walk-off homer and the gut-wrenching strikeout with the bases loaded in the bottom of the ninth. Every batter has times when they’re on fire at the plate and other times when they fall into a deep slump. Teams string together victories to make that late playoff push, while others fall on their face and drop out of the hunt. The game isn’t fair. You never know if you’ll be the hero or the goat. It doesn’t matter if you’re hitting .350 or just struggling to stay above the Mendoza line. You could change the outcome of any given game on any given night. No matter what happens in the present, there is no way to know what the future holds. We go into each season knowing there will be winners and losers, but we just don’t know how it will play out — you never know, so we just sit back, watch, wait, and hopefully enjoy the ride.
In life, you’re sometimes thrown a curve. A scary, 12-6 curve that just dies in the dirt. Rarely do you hit it out of the park. You just try to make contact to survive the at-bat and hope the next pitch has your name on it. Life has tossed me a curve this weekend. My Dad died at the age of 60.
He was a doctor who specialized in infectious diseases, tropical medicine, and global health. He dedicated his life to helping others around the world. He lived in places that, to some of us, seem so far away and undesirable: Oman, Pakistan, China, Nepal, Haiti, and South Africa among others. I lost count of how many countries he had actually traveled too. I would bet it was well over 100. I traveled and lived in many with him. He volunteered his time and expertise to help the underprivileged and under-served. He was a true humanitarian and champion for those who had no voice. He had impressive credentials (attending Notre Dame, Yale, Duke, and Johns Hopkins) but he never sought recognition and money was not his driving force; making a difference was. There is no doubt that he touched a countless number of lives in his years on this Earth.
My Dad wasn’t quite a diehard baseball fan like me. He did follow the White Sox as a kid growing up outside Chicago in the late ’50s and early ’60s. He recounted many stories over the years of “Little Louie”, “The Cuban Comet”, and going to Comiskey in general. After his family moved to Baltimore, he began following the Orioles. Boog, Aparicio, Gentile, Brandt, and Brooksie. Boyhood idols in the making. Don’t ever try to tell him there was a better third baseman than Brooks. He could still recount the complete roster even decades later. In fact, he did this summer he did when he came to visit.
As a kid, we had regular Wiffle ball games in the back yard. He pitched, I hit. We practiced during my t-ball and little league years. He threw popups and grounders and I ran around diving for the balls. I remember him taking me to my first baseball game. I was 6. We went to old Memorial Stadium in Baltimore. Two seasons removed from a World Series title, the O’s still had good talent on their roster. Ripken, Murray, Dempsey, Lynn, Dennis and Tippy Martinez, Storm Davis, and Mike Flanagan among others. I don’t remember why, but on that day they had several players out in the concourse signing autographs. I was so excited. My first autograph. We waited in line for a bit and I’m sure my Dad wasn’t too happy to do so, but he did. I walked up to the table, greeted Mr. Jim Dwyer, and handed him my ball. He snatched it from my hands, scribbled his name, and just handed it back. He didn’t say a word and never made eye contact. I’m sure Jim is a good guy, but on that day he disappointed me. It was fine though and I actually wouldn’t have had it any other way. It provided years of jokes and laughs between my Dad and I. Funny how things go. I loved those times. Baseball and Dad. What kid wouldn’t?
I now know why I love the game and collecting autographs so much. It was you, Dad. In the game of baseball, we lose our boyhood idols as we grow older. So many memories of our childhood pass with them. Well today, the game of life has lost a true hero, idol, and person.
Raymond A. Smego Jr. Dad. You were a great guy. Thanks for being a good dude. I didn’t always tell you how much I appreciated it, but you taught me nearly everything that I know in life. You accomplished so much in your profession, but I hope that I was your greatest accomplishment in the game of life. Your game may be over, but I will carry everything you taught me to make sure I end up a winner. I’ll hit that curveball out of the park for you.
If you happen to know my Dad, please share a story…or if you don’t, please share a story of your Dad and baseball.
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